Freshly Brewed Book Reviews

The freshest book reviews from an avid bibliophile.

“'But do you know this idea of the imaginary homeland? Once you set out from shore on your little boat, once you embark, you'll never truly be at home again. What you've left behind exists only in your memory, and your ideal place becomes some strange imaginary concoction of all you've left behind at every stop.'”

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Claire Messud (The Woman Upstairs)

“I loved being her child. I remember looking at her and thinking she was the most beautiful thing in the world.”

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Claire Messud (The Woman Upstairs)

The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud
I felt this book entirely too keenly to write an unbiased or coherent review of it. The Woman Upstairs simultaneously enraged me and broke my heart, and there’s no more to say on the matter. I’ll sum it up in this way: if you’re a single woman, maybe you should read this. If you’re a single woman, maybe you shouldn’t read this. And if you’re not a single woman, consider this read a mere curiosity as to why the protagonist is able to arouse such deeply felt emotions in single female readers.
The Walking Dead, Compendium Two by Robert Kirkman
Man, if I thought things got real in the first compendium, I was mistaken. This second collection of the comics is out of control and completely unpredictable. No one is safe, and Kirkman isn’t afraid to pack in the punches.I had to finish this book up before season five of The Walking Dead airs, because, while there are differences between the two, the show definitely draws on larger plot points in the comics, and I can’t bear to watch week to week without knowing what’s coming. Although, in this case, maybe I’d have been better off…

The Walking Dead, Compendium Two by Robert Kirkman

Man, if I thought things got real in the first compendium, I was mistaken. This second collection of the comics is out of control and completely unpredictable. No one is safe, and Kirkman isn’t afraid to pack in the punches.

I had to finish this book up before season five of The Walking Dead airs, because, while there are differences between the two, the show definitely draws on larger plot points in the comics, and I can’t bear to watch week to week without knowing what’s coming. Although, in this case, maybe I’d have been better off…

“He wondered whether home was a thing that happened to a place after a while, or if it was something that you found in the end, if you simply walked and waited and willed it long enough.”

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Neil Gaiman (American Gods)

“She went up on tiptoes and kissed Sam, depositing the kiss snugly between Sam’s cheek and the corner of her mouth. You can say a lot of things with a kiss like that.”

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Neil Gaiman (American Gods)

“The house smelled musty and damp, and a little sweet, as if it were haunted by the ghosts of long-dead cookies.”

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Neil Gaiman (American Gods)

“One describes a tale best by telling the tale. You see? The way one describes a story, to oneself or the world, is by telling the story. It is a balancing act and it is a dream. The more accurate the map, the more it resembles the territory. The most accurate map possible would be the territory, and thus would be perfectly accurate and perfectly useless. The tale is the map which is the territory. You must remember this.”

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Neil Gaiman (American Gods)

“'I think I would rather be a man than a god. We don't need anyone to believe in us. We just keep going anyhow. It's what we do.'”

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Neil Gaiman (American Gods)

“'Not only are there no happy endings,' she told him. 'There aren't even any endings.'”

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Neil Gaiman (American Gods)